Making your own

Yogurt that is.  I have given this lesson before, but this time I am including some additional photos in hopes that you will try it.  Making yogurt is very easy, but it does take a few hours setting time.  Often I make it after breakfast, but I also make it sometimes in the evening and let it set overnight so it is ready for breakfast.

yogurtFirstly, find a large clean glass jar with a tight fitting lid.  I use an old peanut butter jar.  Make sure it is clean and has some kind of rubber seal in the lid.

IMG_4015 I use a fresh unopened carton of milk for the milk.  I want to be sure it is free of unwanted bacteria.  It isn’t good to use a carton that the kids left open on the counter when you weren’t paying attention.

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Clean Jar–Whole milk

I use whole milk, but you may also use low fat or non-fat milk, whatever your preference. If you like cream top yogurt, you may add fresh (previously unopened) whipping cream.  Yum!

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Teaspoon of sugar

We like to add a teaspoon of sugar to the mix just to give the milk a little sweetness.

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warming in the microwave

Now you need to warm the milk.  There are several options for this.  You may warm the milk in the jar with the lid on in a pan of warm water on the stove, but be sure that you don’t break the jar.  I use the microwave and for a quart of milk, it takes one minute to bring up the temp to lukewarm (no higher than 90 degrees).  It should feel warm to your finger.

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If this is the first time for you to make yogurt, or you have exhausted your old batches, then purchase a small plain carton of yogurt with live cultures from the grocery.  We like the Greek Yogurt because of its wonderful taste which is transmitted to the new batch you are making.  If you have made a batch, be sure to save some, at least a quarter cup, for the new batch of yogurt.

Stir the new package of yogurt or the quarter cup you saved from the last batch, into the milk thoroughly.  Screw the lid onto the container tightly.

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This photo shows the cooler/thermos that I use to culture the mixture.  It is an Igloo drinks cooler.  You need one that will hold the jar plus at least a quart of hot water.  If you do not have enough water, it will take a long time to culture the yogurt as it will cool too fast.  Refrain from adding boiling water.  It is sufficient to use the hottest tap water you have in your kitchen.

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I have placed a spacer in the bottom of the cooler so the lid will sit up a little higher in the container.  I then fill with the hottest tap water I have up to the edge of the lid of my yogurt container.  Screw on the top of the cooler.  The lid of my cooler is uninsulated, so I put a kitchen towel over the top to insulate it.

IMG_4023Now comes the waiting.  Usually this will take about six hours.  Longer is OK.  What you want to see is yogurt that is thick and creamy.  Remember it will be a little thicker after chilling.  If you want to make quark, you can pour the entire contents,  into a colander lined with cheese cloth and let drain. Remember to save 1/4 cup of yogurt for your next batch.

This yogurt is smooth and creamy with no pectin or gelatin.  It is not real thick, but you can allow it to drain through cheesecloth if you prefer the Icelandic variety of yogurt which is almost spreadable.  If you are making quark, let it drain for several hours, covered to avoid mold spores getting into it.  Then add basil, thyme, oregano or other herbs to make a nice dip or spread or if you want you can use cinnamon, nutmeg and a sprinkle of brown sugar and granola.

We eat it soft with granola, bananas and apple chunks for breakfast or in smoothies.  It also makes great tzatziki.  Enjoy!

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What is it with Squirrels?

Squirrel, Grey, Brown, Fur, Cute, Mammal

(Ready, set, go!)

 

Today I was driving down the road.  This type of event happens almost daily around the island where I live.  I know that it isn’t limited to this area because I have seen it elsewhere as well.

Why do squirrels and chipmunks decide to cross the street just when I am driving by?  Why do they turn around and try to go back instead of just crossing?  Why do they do it several times before I almost run over them?

Are they like dogs who chase cars and bite at the tires?  Are they trying to bite my car tires?

As I pass the spot where the squirrel has changed his direction several times before I pass and I look in my rear view mirror cringing.  Did I run over the insane critter?  Most of the time the answer is no.  Does he just sit under the middle of the car as I pass and then race off to the side?

What is the explanation? Well, many websites posit many answers while others admit that they haven’t a clue.  I still haven’t a clue.  I strongly suspect these are teen-aged squirrels and there is a buddy in the bushes at the side of the road and they are playing a game of chicken!

Experiments in Painting

Poor Reception

As most of you know, I am a painter, an artist, a teacher.  I try to stay focused on being an oil painter, but sometimes I go off and experiment with different media (types of art).  Recently I had a show in Langley and showed some work that was an offshoot in a different direction.  I sold eleven pieces.  This made me ponder.  Was I working in the wrong medium—oil? Why was the new medium so popular, was it the subject or the medium? Or is it the price?

I am still asking myself these questions as I now have just hung a new show at the Flower House Café in Bayview on Whidbey Island.  I will see what kind of response these pieces receive in the new location.

My experiment is with encaustics, a form of painting on a rigid substrate with wax.  It is a very old technique, but one that is new to me.  I have experimented a little in the past, but not tried to sell any until last summer when I did a series on crows.

I know, crows are popular subjects and maybe the popularity of the paintings was because of the subject and not the medium.  Crows are the thief that stole the sun according to northwest native legend.  They have always been mysterious.  People actually like them, city people.  Farmers like me find them a nuisance. They get into the chicken house and steal the eggs, they steal the kitchen scraps I give the chickens, they eat the friendly garter snake which is a beneficial member of my garden’s ecological community, they steal bird eggs and baby birds.  They steal shiny objects (like the sun). They are messy. They wash their “kill” in my birdbaths leaving body parts and entrails to pollute the water. Yuk! Right now they are fighting over a rabbit carcass in the street. I can hear them inside my house over the howl of the wind outside.

Be that as it may, they were popular paintings and sold well, so I have created more and they are showing until the beginning of June at the Flower House Café (http://www.bayviewfarmandgarden.com/flower-house-cafe.html).

Since encaustics have drips around the edges and I like the look of the drips, they become problematic for framing.  I mount them on a painted black board to feature the irregularities of the edges.  It works for me and keeps the framing costs to a minimum, thus I can sell each piece cheaply, which may be another reason why they sell so well. My oil paintings need to be framed and are considerably more expensive.  We will see how it goes.

If you have a chance, be sure to see the show.