Experiments in Painting

Poor Reception

As most of you know, I am a painter, an artist, a teacher.  I try to stay focused on being an oil painter, but sometimes I go off and experiment with different media (types of art).  Recently I had a show in Langley and showed some work that was an offshoot in a different direction.  I sold eleven pieces.  This made me ponder.  Was I working in the wrong medium—oil? Why was the new medium so popular, was it the subject or the medium? Or is it the price?

I am still asking myself these questions as I now have just hung a new show at the Flower House Café in Bayview on Whidbey Island.  I will see what kind of response these pieces receive in the new location.

My experiment is with encaustics, a form of painting on a rigid substrate with wax.  It is a very old technique, but one that is new to me.  I have experimented a little in the past, but not tried to sell any until last summer when I did a series on crows.

I know, crows are popular subjects and maybe the popularity of the paintings was because of the subject and not the medium.  Crows are the thief that stole the sun according to northwest native legend.  They have always been mysterious.  People actually like them, city people.  Farmers like me find them a nuisance. They get into the chicken house and steal the eggs, they steal the kitchen scraps I give the chickens, they eat the friendly garter snake which is a beneficial member of my garden’s ecological community, they steal bird eggs and baby birds.  They steal shiny objects (like the sun). They are messy. They wash their “kill” in my birdbaths leaving body parts and entrails to pollute the water. Yuk! Right now they are fighting over a rabbit carcass in the street. I can hear them inside my house over the howl of the wind outside.

Be that as it may, they were popular paintings and sold well, so I have created more and they are showing until the beginning of June at the Flower House Café (http://www.bayviewfarmandgarden.com/flower-house-cafe.html).

Since encaustics have drips around the edges and I like the look of the drips, they become problematic for framing.  I mount them on a painted black board to feature the irregularities of the edges.  It works for me and keeps the framing costs to a minimum, thus I can sell each piece cheaply, which may be another reason why they sell so well. My oil paintings need to be framed and are considerably more expensive.  We will see how it goes.

If you have a chance, be sure to see the show.

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Summer Fun

 

In his sites

(this crow is made from tarpaper embedded into the wax) (titled: “In His Sites”)

Well the calendar says it is summer.  It is raining and almost the end of July.  Last week, however, we did have some moderate days of sunshine mixed, intermittently, with clouds.  Since it wasn’t raining and it wasn’t too hot, I decided to work on an outdoor project.

As I have mentioned before, I am an artist, primarily a painter, though I dabble in printmaking and other art forms.  I also teach.

One form of painting that I practice, from time to time, is encaustic painting.  This is melted wax to a board.  For color I use various materials including oil pastels, crayolas, powdered graphite, powdered pigments and more.  I often imbed objects, bits of paper, old subway tickets, playing cards, and other refuse into the pieces.

Over the course of two weeks, I completed sixteen paintings for a show that will hang in mid September.  The theme is crows.  Some of the crows are painted with oil pastels and melted into the wax, some are cutouts in tarpaper that is imbedded.  Some of the crows are tissue paper imbedded.

I use a heat gun, and electric griddle and a blow torch to melt the wax. Depending on the effect I want, I will paint on melted wax with a brush, maybe push it around with the blow torch.  The ends of my fingers get encased with the wax and I tend to rub them together, crumbling the wax which falls to the ground, consequently, I don’t want to do this in the house. I would track wax crumbs into the floors and rugs, which is not a good thing as it is slightly sticky.

I am fond of using crayolas in this process as I can melt them on the griddle and paint them into the wax with a brush, or I can color onto the cooled wax and melt them.  They move around a lot.  Oil pastel tends to stay where I put it.

I will be having a show of these works at the Braeburn Restaurant in Langley, Washington, https://braeburnlangley.com/ September 19th through October 14th, 2016.  I hope that some of you are able to visit the show.

PS: My students are having a show at the Braeburn July 25th to September 19th and another educational exhibit at the Island County Fair in Langley, August 4 through August 7, 2016 http://fair.whidbeyislandfair.com/

Poor Reception

(titled “Poor Reception”)