Enjoying the Harvest

img_3498Being an avid vegetable gardener, I was very interested in a program that the local school district is doing to help children learn about food production and preparation.  It looks like it was a great success.  Go to  https://whidbeyschoolgardens.wordpress.com/ to see the results.

We did have a wonderful year for the vegetables.  We have been giving lots to the local foodbank and friends. The tomatoes were especially productive and we have definitely eaten our fill.  We also have several dozen bottles of various tomato products sitting in the root cellar shelves.  The Brussels Sprouts are just ready now as we have just had our first frost (a very late one this year) and now they will be sweeter to eat.  The leeks are wonderful too.  We will have those fresh all winter.

The gold nugget squashes are sitting safe from mice and rats and we can eat those for the entire winter.  They will probably be gone by spring and we must have had about fifty of them.  Gave quite a few away too.  We like these in particular as they are just the right size for two people.  Though I like baked squash, hubbards and their kind are just too big.  I have tried baking them and putting them in the freezer, but it is just too much, so we have settled on the gold nugget.  They are sweet, very yellow and are also suitable for making pies.  I cut them in half and fill with sausage or sausage and cornbread dressing, or just with butter and brown sugar. Yum.

Well the dark days of winter are here and some days I am not sure the sun has even come up.  Today we will have sunrise at 7:48 a.m. and sunset at 4:15 p.m.  Not a very long day, especially when you almost need flashlights during the day.  All the lights are on in the house just to help us stay awake.

I am on my way out to chop firewood again.  With this cold snowy weather, we have burned quite a bit of wood to keep warm.  Now it is time to warm myself working outdoors splitting it.  It is something I have written about previously in this blog and something I do enjoy.

Happy Holidays and keep warm!

 

A Frosty Morn

ringneck-doves

Just came in from feeding the animals.  It is cold again this morning.  It was colder yesterday morning at 22 degrees, which for Western Washington, is cold.  Since we have rather high humidity, the cold is more penetrating.  For those who live in the mid-west, they probably would consider these temps a heat wave. Ha!

Everything is frozen outside, so the first thing I had to do when getting suited up to meet the weather challenges was to fill a large bucket with very hot water.  The doves, the baby chicks and the molting old hens all need to have their waterers unfrozen.  I also filled the birdbaths with warm water as the poor wild birds have no place to drink.

We have one baby dove who is just now fending for himself and I was worried that he might not make it through this cold.  This morning he is huddled in a corner trying to keep warm as his mother has now abandoned him since he can feed himself.  He was fine and jumped right in when the feed was provided.

The ten chicks, which are now two months old, are very hardy, but today I gave them their first cracked corn, which helps warm the chickens from the inside out.  The also got fresh bread, which they chased all over their pen.  The cold doesn’t seem to faze them.

The old hens, however, felt the cold.  Why do they choose to molt just when the weather turns cold.  Molting, as I have mentioned in earlier pieces, is the process of losing all their feathers and growing a new set, which means they are not laying any eggs.  So we are between eggs with old ones molting and new ones too young yet.  I hate buying store eggs.

The plantings in the yard look sad, especially the rhododendrons that lower their leaves as though dead or dying.  This is the way they look in the heat of summer when they are in dire need of water.  I always hate the look of them in this cold.

I know when things thaw that there will be lots of mud because the frost has pushed up around the stones in all the pathways making crunching noises as I walk out to do the chores.

The advantage to all the trouble above is THE SUN IS SHINING. It is a trade off.  If we have sunshine, we have cold weather.  If it is in the 40s then it will rain and be grey.  Yesterday and this morning, we can bask in its warmth and enjoy the vitamins it gives to us, though begrudgingly in winter.  Makes me feel perkier already.  Amazing what a little sunshine can do for your mental health.

Guess I will go for a walk and enjoy it.  Never know how long it will last.

Cowboy/girl poetry

I just recently returned from vacation.  While I was wandering around Eastern Washington, I happened on a cowboy poetry event.  I learned of it the night before and I am especially fond of cowboy poetry because it rhymes and has rhythm.  I get flummoxed by  poetry that doesn’t have either.

Well the upshot is, I wrote a poem the next morning and my husband coerced me into reading it at the event. It is my first venture into cowboy/girl poetry. Mine was simple, neither complex nor elaborate.  Some produce epic poems with long tales to tell, but here is mine, such as it is.  I think that much of the subtleties were lost on the audience.  I guess you need to be a farmer or rancher to understand some of them.

The Rancher’s Wife

 

Work from dawn to setting sun,

The rancher’s work is never done.

Milk the cow, geld the bull,

Ranching life is never dull

 

Pick the beans, gather eggs,

Clean the barn, repair the rigs.

Mow the field, bale the hay,

What to do rest of day?

 

To the bank to make a deal.

We need to buy another wheel.

Try to keep the wolves at bay.

And live to fight another day.

 

Little sleep at night from worry.

Get up early and start to hurry.

Line crews up and needs their grub,

Scrub laundry with lots of suds.

 

Now its time to mend the fence.

How can those beeves be so dense

As to lean and pull and ravage them?

We could just lock them in the pen.

 

Calves get skinny and horses founder.

What business plan could be much sounder?

Sheep need dippin’ and chicks are pippin’,

The ranch wife’s life ain’t coffee sippin.

 

Traded satin for Sorrel boots

Long and far from my roots.

College never taught me this

But hard work brings me bliss.

 

In the heat of sun or the chill of snow

We are out at sunrise, on the go.

Rain and sleet, sweat and chill,

To give up ranching, ‘never will.