Homemade Biscuit Mix

When we go camping and even at home, I have a batch of homemade biscuit mix in a container in the cupboard.  We have waffles, pancakes, muffins, or biscuits at least a couple of times a week and I found having a mix on hand makes the morning’s chores go more quickly.  My general mix is for the buttermilk variety.  If you want to make the recipe with sweet milk, then leave out the baking soda.

For the batch I make for the RV, I use powdered buttermilk in the mix so all I have to add is water, oil, and for all but the biscuits, eggs.  If you want to make scones, add a little sugar.  If you don’t have buttermilk, you can use a cup of milk with a tablespoon of vinegar or lemon juice added and let it set for a few minutes before adding.

 

The mix:

6 cups all purpose flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 tablespoon baking soda

2 teaspoons salt

Shake all these together in an air-tight container and you are ready to go.

If you are camping you can add 1 cup powdered buttermilk to the mix, in which case, you just add water for the liquid. Remember buttermilk needs the soda.  Regular sweet milk only needs the baking powder, not the baking soda.

When you are ready to make biscuits, take 2 cups of the mix.  Add 1/4 cup vegetable oil and 1/2 to 3/4 cup buttermilk (if you are using the camping mix, just add waterand oil).  Variations:  You can add grated cheese, herbs, red pepper flakes, bacon bits or whatever inspires.  If you want to make scones, increase the oil to 1/3 c or substitute butter and add 3 tablespoons of sugar.  I like to add white chocolate chips and dried cranberries.  Any nuts are good, try hazelnuts and when you are ready to eat spread with Nutella. Yum!

For waffles or pancakes, use the same proportions as above, but add a little more liquid (about a cup)to achieve the correct consistency.  We like to add nuts to the waffles or bacon bits.  Pancakes can have sliced bananas added (if served with peanut butter, Elvis would be happy).  Ricotta cheese added to pancakes with a goodly amount of lemon zest shavings makes a great pancake, but plain is good too.

For muffins, line the tins with greased muffin papers or just grease the pan.  Mix 2 cups of mix with 1/3 C white or brown sugar, 1/4C vegetable oil, and 1 cup buttermilk mixed with one egg.  I like to add dates, cranberries, craisins, nuts, bacon bits, pieces of dried fruit, blueberries, orange zest, lemon zest, vanilla or almond extract, just about anything.  I sprinkle them with coarse raw sugar and bake at 400 degrees about 15 minutes.  Any of the additions make for great muffins.  Serve with lots of butter and jam.

Hopefully you will find this is a great mix to keep for camping or just making your mornings easier.  You can make almost any recipe you find on a biscuit mix box, but you need to add oil as the commercial stuff has shortening added.  If you add it to your homemade mix, then it needs to be refrigerated.  I usually skip that and add it when I am making breakfast.

Happy baking.

Camping in November

An out of focus photo of Ft. Warden Light near Pt. Townsend Washington.img_3466I probably should say that we went glamping as we stayed in our travel trailer and out of the cold, inclement weather.  Since I didn’t have to work on Veteran’s Day, I had a space of five days free and we decided at the last minute to travel to the Olympic Peninsula in Western Washington State.  For us this entails a ferry ride since we live on Whidbey Island.

Early on Thursday, my first day off, we headed to the Keystone Ferry in the middle of Whidbey.  This ferry takes us to Pt. Townsend, one of my favorite towns in Washington.  It has an 19th century charm that is going though restoration off and on, but still in keeping with the National Historic District status.  Beautiful three and four story brick buildings with Victorian flair.

We stayed at Pt. Hudson our last night and visited the town, but the first day we headed for Sequim (pronounced SQUIM).  John Wayne owned a substantial piece of waterfront on Sequim Bay many years ago where he moored his yacht, The Grey Goose, when he was in the area.  The land was donated to the county and is now a beautiful marina, campground, boat launching area and more, well protected by the long spit that juts across the mouth of the bay.  Calmer seas prevail here as the spit almost encloses the bay with a small passage out to the Straits of Juan de Fuca outside the passage.

Kingfishers, herons, seagulls and crows love the beach by the RV park.  I love watching the kingfishers dive into the water, coming up with small fish. Their turquoise and green iridescence makes them spectacular.  They look a little crazy with such big heads and small bodies.

Next we went to Joyce, Washington to stay at Salt Creek State Park.  This park has a very rocky precipice overlooking the Straits.  Waves crash on the rocks below the cliffs.  The park is a fairly steep hill which has been terraced for the RVs.  We backed into a space in the highest tear, thus having an unobstructed view of the straits and the shipping lanes there.  I love to watch the ships go by and I can do it from my dinette table inside.  We saw oil tankers, car carriers, and container ships interspersed with the minuscule fishing boats. The two lighthouses on Vancouver Island were visible flashing their lights after dark.  They were hardly visible through the fog and moisture in the air during the day.

We took a day trip to Forks and LaPush and had lunch one day.  Hiked around the campground another as it is an old fort from WWI.  The neighboring bay, Crescent Beach, was packed with surfers, though there wasn’t much for surf the day we watched. Cougars had been sighted in the region and they suggested you keep you children and pets on a short leash.

We did see some seals out in a large bull kelp bed.  Picked up some shells and beach glass while wondering beaches.

It was warmish, with the temperatures in the mid 50s.  Sunday, however there was a gale that made it hard to push open the door of the travel trailer to get out.  We were glad to be in Pt. Townsend and not at home that night.  (Our home is situated in a treed area and often we need to leave home if storms are to dangerous.) We were only staying one night, but we unhitched as it was difficult to walk against the wind to downtown, many blocks away.  Had a great dinner, once again, at The Fountain Cafe.  They never fail to please us and we are very hard to please.

Mostly, this was a relaxing trip.  We took our time, did a lot of reading in the evenings, slept late, and were generally lazy.  We didn’t have to be anyplace and any particular time and we just wandered, a great way to spend a little time off.

 

 

 

 

A Good Vacation

Arches national park 5It was a good trip, not a great trip, but a good one.  We made it home from Moab, Utah on time for me to get to my obligations.  We put 3000 miles on the truck, two-thirds of which were when we were pulling the fifth wheel trailer.  We saw lots of sites, did quite a few things and in general had a passable vacation.

They say a change is as good as a vacation.  Since it was raining here, I guess snow was a change.  We had checked for several weeks before we left to see what the weather was doing down in that part of the country and they were having sunshine.  So off we went in search of sunshine.  Unfortunately, we didn’t get sunshine.  We got snow.

We had also hoped to boondock (dry camping without benefit of water, electricity, sewer). We have a propane furnace in the trailer and it works well if we are plugged in to electricity so the fan can distribute the heat.  It was COLD every night which necessitated being able to plug in to keep warm.  A couple of nights, we had three quilts on and it was still on the chilly side.

We went there for warmth.  Boy were we misguided.  We did get some sunshine, but it was the cool, watery sort that does not warm the bones.

Moab Utah is a sporting town.  Folks who go there are into danger sports of which many can be found there. They had just had a LARGE jeep rally that had made it almost impossible to find a campground to stay.  Luckily we found one that was relatively new and it had availability.  The folks were wonderful though the site still needs a lot of contouring to make it more comfortable.

The best part of Utah was the rocks which were spectacular even though we had to wait almost a half hour to get into the park the line was so long. (In the photo above, the rock balancing on a thinner column is called a Hoodoo.) We get into the parks free on the Senior National Parks Pass.  It is $10 for your lifetime.  Good starting when you turn 62.  I really recommend that you get one if you are that age or older.  You can also camp half price at a lot of BLM, National Forests and other National sites.

We spent a good deal of our time in the Arches National Park and the CanyonLands National Park.  We also visited the Fremont Indian Museum in Sevier, Utah which I found most interesting.  Geology is great, but I like it mixed with a little Paleontology and Anthropology as well. A couple of museums we went to see were closed unfortunately.  I was sorry to miss the one in Green River, Utah.  Another in Lehi, Utah was difficult to visit while towing the trailer.

We returned through Idaho, spending the night in McCall where the temperature was 27.  Thank goodness we were plugged in and the furnace was going full blast.  You have to realize that most trailers are not insulated very well. They get very hot in summer and cold at nights in the winter.

We came back to Washington State and stayed at the city park in Soap Lake, Washington for two days and I have to say that they were the best days of the whole trip.  It is beautiful country with lots of rocky buttes and towers, caves and wonderful formations but, unfortunately, without the spectacular colors of Utah.  They are columnar basalt formations with amazing patterns caused by lava flowing into water.  Very dark in color with few of the reds seen in the south.  Some have beautiful yellow lichen growing on them.

Soap Lake is a mineral lake and the “waters” are taken for their health benefits which include a high saline content.  You can float easily.  The school was on spring break and the sun was shining and the kids were out swimming and paddle boarding and kayaking.

I guess the lesson to be learned here is that we don’t need to travel 1100 miles to find our vacation dreams, some are right in our own back yard!